Spotlight 2016

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We are delighted to present

Spotlight 2016 :  Reframing : PhD Research at CSM

This year Spotlight 2016 presents a wide-range of research in Art, Design and Fashion, through an Exhibition, a Symposium, and a Long Table.

Spotlight 2016 includes the work of the following Doctoral Students at CSM:

Gill Addison

Sara Buoso

Adriana Cobo

Mahtab Hanna

Julie Janet Chauffier

Armenoui Kasparian Saraidari

Shinsuke Nakano

Giorgio Salani

Lucy Russell

Tamara Tyler

 

Spotlight 2016 Invite poster[1] copy

Spotlight 2016 Invite poster[1] copy

 

The Exhibition

Windows Gallery at CSM presents the work of Mahtab Hanna, Tamara Tyrer, Adriana Cobo-Corey, Giorgio Salani, Gill Addison, Shinsuke Nakano, Lucy Russell, and Armenoui Kasparian Saraidari. More information about their work is below:

 

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Work by: Giorgio Salani, Adriana Cobo-Corey, Gill Addison

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Work by:  Shinsuke Nakano, Tamara Tyrer, Lucy Russell

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Work by: Mahtab Hanna, Armenoui Kasparian Saraidari

 

Details below

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Mahtab Hanna

REFRAMING JEWELLRY

Silent Protest: Political Jewellery

Political jewellery is about perspective: the ability to communicate an individual’s or group’s isolation and pessimism, and convert it to a method of communication to bring together people wanting to share values, beliefs or ideals, all in a single action.

Identity, gender and consciousness is always a theme within politics and political jewellery, but it is the values and views of those within a movement, for example progressive, oppressive or radical, that creates the debate.

Silent protest can be developed by the way a wearer adorns the item of jewellery, as well as how and by whom the jewellery is made. Can a jeweller be called a messenger? Does society deem it necessary to allow communication through a static inanimate object that communicates a clear vision, a definitive symbol of a movement or does it create a gap between the messenger and those at whom the message is aimed?

The beliefs of many can be divided into segments, namely those who have invented those messages, the patrons of the jewellery, then those whose job is to proclaim and eulogise the meaning according to a scripted message, and, finally, the consumers, be they monopolists of thought or granters of freedom of thinking. Whether it is a totalitarian state or regime, the politics and counter politics of jewellery is akin to the official as well as unofficial representation of power and struggle

Life and art forms in the method of jewellery are both finite, yet infinite in their evolution – the politics of jewellery shows the image of what is now and the promise of what is to come, where it may be deemed radical one day and merely “different” thereafter. One may define it as a struggle; the other may define it as progress. Jewellery in the Middle East needs two elements to survive – a challenge to evolve thinking from expression of freedom to the freedom of expression, and to partake in a revolution to destroy the taboos and barriers that culture and tradition have built, in many cases unnecessarily.

Jewellery is, at its purest, about the formation of community and communication, where individuality no longer has to struggle to be heard above the din of cloned thinking.

Mahtab Hanna is an award winning jewellery artist undertaking doctoral research at Central Saint Martins. Her focus is on silent protest, the questionable existence role and impact of political jewellery.  Mahtab’s focus leads to researching whether jewellery can be politicised in terms of conveying a clear message (whether hidden or explicit), or a definitive symbol of an idea or community, in a static inanimate object.

 

Tamara Tyrer

REFRAMING FILM

Chorine

Chorine investigates the question and possibility of representing a female space and time through a visual evocation of interiority and female subjectivity: firstly, by exploring the ways in which filmic technique can be used to represent time and perception and secondly, by creating a form of ‘haptic cinema.’ Chorine uses the filmic technique of slow motion (shot on a high speed industrial camera filming at 1000 and 500 frames per second) to evoke an interior, haptic space, exploring the notions of stillness and motion, then and now. The dancer’s body is explored as the instrument and conductor of time. The body is presented as one crossing, spiraling, invoking temporalities and liminalities, mimetically re-visioning images of turn of the twentieth century dance and of women and water. Chorine evokes ideas of thresholds and transitional states, referencing a ritualistic, mythic and fairy tale language. Chorine draws on the concept of haptic visuality to explore a palpable, visceral filmmaking, and the idea of embodiment in order to evoke a female interiority and subjectivity.

Tamara Tyrer is a practising artist specialising in film, video, dance and performance. Her research is an enquiry into the notion of a female space, time and subjectivity by creating a form of haptic cinema. The title of her research is Of Space and Time: Film and the Female Performer. As part of her practice she created Whoopee, a performance theatre cabaret, creating site -specific shows at The Porchester Baths, The V&A Museum, Blackpool Tower Ballroom, The ICA and many others.

 

Adriana Cobo-Corey

REFRAMING-TASTE

Taste Untold/Story 1: Wash Out!

Chronologies of architectural taste can be traced following familiar timelines starting, for example, with Georgian architecture and neoclassical revivals, and ending with modernism and postmodernism as the main markers of taste for the past century. But, could we construct stories of taste outside of the logic of style and formal canon? Instead of understanding taste as a ready-made set of architectural styles, could we rather think about it as a rooted set of habits through which architects embody and perform architecture?

Since May 2015, I have made washing my own clothes out in the fountains on Granary Square a documented architectural habit. Along the way, I have staged two performances on site: The Great Unwashed, which draws from the history of Granary Square as a working hub, questioning the connexions between the form of re-urbanised sites, and the programmes of use they instigate. And Everyone Needs to Wash! which takes this sentence by modern architectural hero Le Corbusier, as a doorway into the cleaning obsessions and functional mannerisms characteristic of modern architecture. These two performances, documented on video for the Spotlight 2016/Reframing exhibition, explore cleaning as an architectural place-making habit with the intention of delving into the subject of taste through function and action, and to stage untold stories of taste for architecture.

If you want to see the performances happening alongside this exhibition during the coming weeks, please check the hand written schedules on the Window Gallery for dates, times and directions. Thank you.

 Bio: Adriana is an architect and scenographer. Her current PhD project entitled Taste Untold, explores the connexions between architecture, habit and taste. Adriana has a practice as an architecture lecturer and panoramist. Her installation work explores themes such as love, drawing, cities, replica and pastiche and currently, taste. She has exhibited in different cities including London, Bogota, Cali and Wroclaw. She has lectured in many architecture schools both in Colombia and the UK.

 

Giorgio Salani

REFRAMING-POTTERY

Giorgio Salani is a doctoral student at Central Saint Martins. His research aims to define craft qualities and values in contemporary production of handmade functional tableware pottery in the UK and Japan. This is conducted through a combination of video-ethnography and reflection on his own ceramic practice. The study engages with key concepts in craft theory such as the relationship art/craft/design, the notion of tradition and the value of making work by hand.

 

Gill Addison

REFRAMING METHOD

Performing Pavilion

 Pavilion is the collective title for a series of works, which aim to explore and examine the process of reconstruction as a form of research practice.

Performing Pavilion is a diagrammatic representation of the connections between the research materials, references, and arguments that have surfaced in the development of the moving image work – Pavilion #1.

In an attempting to manifest the materiality of a research process Performing Pavilion can be understood as a ‘Lecture of Objects’. Anchoring (for a moment) the shifting and evolving narratives that have been generated by the collective works that constitute Pavilion.

Bio: Gill Addison is an artist/filmmaker and academic. Her practice-based research project Something to hold onto – The re-materialisation of research in moving image practice seeks to examine and interrogate the practices, processes, and problematization of research in artist’s moving image. Gill’s work has been presented and screened both national and internationally at film festivals and screening centres. She was the commissioning editor of Art in Sight/ Filmwaves 2003-08, is a Senior Lecturer in Fine Art at Chelsea College of Art and co-ordinates the Chelsea Film Forum, she is a member of the Subjectivity and Feminisms Research group at University of the Arts, London.

 

Shinsuke Nakano

REFRAMING-TECHNICS

Witness to the will of Mark Sayer, a tailor in Arundel Street, Strand, London, in 1761

This installation is based on the will (the legal document) made by the 18th century local tailor Mark Sayer, whose shop was located in Arundel Street in London. This will was witnessed in 1761 by the gentlemen Thomas Tomkyns and Robert Mylne, the latter was one of the tailor’s regular clients. Exploring making as a mode of remembering, the artist reconstructs the event of the witness by having recourse to the will as well as the tailor’s letters, day books and memorandum inherited and survived until today.

 Bio: Shinsuke Nakano is a Research student at Central Saint Martins. His practice-based research interrogates what the act of remembering means in the age of infinite digital memory storage. His thesis explores fashion practice as a mode of remembering through dressmaking, performance and digital media.

 

Lucy Russell

REFRAMING-BODY-IMAGE

 Lucy Russell is an artist and Design PhD candidate at Central Saint Martins (London Doctoral Design Centre studentship). Practice-based research investigates whether her own practice of (re)drawing can translate into a praxis that could assist others to facilitate critical-dialogue engagement with designed body-image(s) in fashion and beauty magazine advertisementsImplementing social innovation to create a toolkit that augments participants reframing of an issue through drawing.

 

Armenoui Kasparian Saraidari

REFRAMING-TRAUMA

Nameless Stills

My family was part of the larger movement of the Armenian populations that experienced the massacres and mass deportations from their historic homeland. Nameless is a 16mm film that I manually created in the darkroom by isolating and exposing close up portraits from group pictures from my family archive.
The creation of the Nameless was devised in response to the voids of memory and knowledge within my family archive. In larger or smaller group pictures, portraits and snapshots appear unrecognisable faces. Remaining nameless evokes a loss of identity and as Nancy Martha West (2008, 85) suggests, ‘if we posit a correlation between naming and being, then the nameless in a sense don’t exist’. Nameless creates an analogy between the loss of singularity in a photographic archive and through the mass killings. It attempts to restore their facelessness by offering each individual a single frame and later a single print.

I relied on methodologies from photographic practice and filmmaking and created a camera-less film. Through repetitive exposures, in the darkroom I manually replaced the work of a video-camera and drew attention to each individual. Then, using the positive 16mm film in printing the Nameless Stills on photographic paper, resulted in the inversion of the colours. Due to several transformations of the initial archival print, from photographic to moving-image film and then to photographic paper, the material attributes of the images have almost vanished. The nostalgic archival images have turned into harsh, disturbing images that reference the hyper-mediated documentations of the Armenian atrocities.

Bio: Kasparian is currently a PhD candidate at Central Saint Martins, with an AHRC studentship, and a former research fellow at the Library of Congress in Washington, DC. Her practice focuses on photographic archives, memory, postmemory and
trauma. A fourth-generation survivor of the Armenian Genocide, her work explores the materiality of photography and its use as a referent that bears witness to the genocide and diaspora. Exhibitions include: CRASSH Research Centre of Cambridge University, the Christie’s and the Pingyao International Photography Festival 2014 in China.

 

 

The Symposium

With presentations by Julie Janet Chauffier, Adriana Cobo Corey, Giorgio Salani, Mahtab Hanna, Shinsuke Nakano, Sara Buoso, and Lucy Russell.

25th February 2016  (10 AM – 5 PM)

Futuro House, on the roof of CSM

 

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Julie Janet Chauffier

Reframing innovation

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Abstract: What are the values involved and the desired outcome of innovation? What strategies can we implement to monitor the quality of innovation? To optimize the chances of change being adopted?

The talk will call on various contemporary thinkers to frame an innovative perspective.

Bio: Sociologist and Typeface designer, Julie Janet Chauffier looks for the links between form and content. Her current doctoral research at Central Saint Martins focuses on the expressivity of lettershapes, extra meaning hidden in plain sight. Arguing that shapes can be mapped by clustering them by physical similarities she presented a type sorting project at the annual conference of the Association Typographique Internationale in Hong Kong in 2012. She¹s now adding a layer of meaning to the map.

(respondent: Giorgio Salani)

 

Adriana Cobo Corey

Taste Untold/Story 1: Wash Out!

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Abstract: Motivated by the fact that taste in architecture has been generally communicated through stylistic codes, my general thesis argues that the construction of architectural styles might have left alternative taste narratives under-explored. This inquiry into taste investigates the possibility to situate and create marginal practices within voids of taste; seeking to talk about taste in architecture by prioritising function, action and habit over form and style. Taste Untold devises taste narratives in connexion to performance, as a temporal maker of place; and with feminist approaches to space, counter to the patriarchal tradition in architecture.

This presentation will focus on cleaning, a subject implicitly or explicitly present within both, modernist utopias and feminist performance practices throughout the twentieth century. Cleaning will be discussed here as a post-rational reflection on Wash Out! a series of performances devised for Granary Square, London 2015-16.

Bio: Adriana is an architect and scenographer. Her current PhD project entitled Taste Untold, explores the connexions between architecture, habit and taste. Adriana has a practice as an architecture lecturer and panoramist. Her installation work explores themes such as love, drawing, cities, replica and pastiche and currently, taste. She has exhibited in different cities including London, Bogota, Cali and Wroclaw. She has lectured in many architecture schools both in Colombia and the UK.

Respondent: Gillian Addison

 

Giorgio Salani

Reframing Pottery

Workshop. Brief table discussions 

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Abstract: The workshop will provide an interactive platform to learn how to read qualities and values in ceramic mugs. A skeletal powerpoint presentation will complement discussion about handmade ceramics mugs. Different readings and interactions with the ideas, images and physical objects will be used to assess various types of appreciation and thinking: abstract, visual and haptic. A short video and stories associated with the mug will also be used to enhance experiences and understanding. Alternating different methods is also designed to engage participant in ever-changing discussions about the same object and reflect on the varied nature of research inquiry.

Bio: Giorgio Salani is a doctoral student at Central Saint Martins. His research aims to define craft qualities and values in contemporary production of handmade functional tableware pottery in the UK and Japan. This is conducted through a combination of video-ethnography and reflection on his own ceramic practice. The study engages with key concepts in craft theory such as the relationship art/craft/design, the notion of tradition and the value of making work by hand.

Respondent: Julie Janet Chauffer

 

Mahtab Hanna

Political Jewellery: Silent Protest in the field of re framing jewellery.

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Abstract: Life and art forms in the method of jewellery are both finite, yet infinite in their evolution – the politics of jewellery shows the image of what is now and the promise of what is to come, where it may be seen radical one day and becomes simply different on another day.

  • Political jewellery can be defined as a struggle on the one hand, but also progress on the other hand. Jewellery in the Middle East needs two elements to survive – a challenge to evolve thinking from expression of freedom to the freedom of expression (a very important difference), and be part of a revolution to destroy the taboos and barriers that culture and tradition have built, in many cases unnecessarily.
  • In the end, jewellery is, at its purest, about the creation of community and communication, where individuality does not have to struggle to be heard above the noise of cloned thinking.
  • I shall provide examples of Middle Eastern artists, with a focus on Iran, that have tried in their own field to contribute to this arena.

Bio: Mahtab Hanna is an award winning jewellery artist undertaking doctoral research at Central Saint Martins. Her focus is on silent protest, the questionable existence role and impact of political jewellery.  Mahtab’s focus leads to researching whether jewellery can be politicised in terms of conveying a clear message (whether hidden or explicit), or a definitive symbol of an idea or community, in a static inanimate object.

 respondent: Lucy Russell)

 

Shinsuke Nakano

poiētic-enframing — memory and technics

Reframing Memory

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Abstract: My contribution to the symposium will be reframing the relationship between technics and memory, making and remembering, by addressing contemporary art and design practices in the age of ‘industrialisation of memory’ by digital media. 
This investigation will inquire into Plato’s hypomnesis (‘external’ memory in contrast with mneme, or anamnesis, ‘internal’ memory) and also Heidegger’s account on technics as revealing[alētheia], on the one hand, as bringing-forth[poiēsis]  and, on the other, as Enframing[Gestell].
This paper looks at contemporary art and crafts, especially, fashion, film and performance.

Bio: Shinsuke Nakano is a Research student at Central Saint Martins. His practice-based research interrogates what the act of remembering means in the age of infinite digital memory storage. His thesis explores fashion practice as a mode of remembering through dressmaking, performance and digital media.

 Respondent: Mahtab Hanna

 

Sara Buoso

Frames of Light: towards the Experience.

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Abstract: The paper addresses an enquiry of framing theories in light-art by questioning: “What Does Light Frame?. Emerged from the light’s materiality, the paper departs from notions of technology (Heidegger’s Gestell, 1954) and referential system (Derrida’s Parergon, 1979) to investigate the frames within light operates. Defined as meta-concepts, frames are examined both in the poietic fields with reference to contemporary light-art practices, and in the interpretative contexts. The presentation intends to outline new parameters affecting the experience of light including a situational and corporeal perception, as the research’s methodology proposes.

Bio: Sara Buoso is a PhD student at CSM. Research by theory conducted through a critical approach to contemporary practices of light, specifically light-art. The focus of work is light-matter understood as an autonomous concept of speculation in post-modernity, examined throughh the interplay of the material, the practice and meaning. Research studies emerged from Art-writing (Juliet Art Magazine, Ars-Key Teknemedia), curatorial practices and museums’ education.

Respondent: Adriana Cobo Corey                                                                                               

 

Lucy Russell

Looking Good: Drawing out knowledge

Abstract:

What is it?

In this workshop participants will explore drawing not only as a means for communication with others, but as a tool for observation. Considering the process of thinking through drawing as a reflective practice (communication with self), which could be used to develop, assist and compliment any work process or research practice. Experiencing the action of thinking through making (drawing) which I describe as drawn notes, is central to my own research methodology.

Why take part?

This is not about making works of art instead, the process, the action will provide artefacts that document and support the participants thought process.

There is a potential to deepen or reframe engagement with material as the narrative is not limited to words alone.

Bio: Lucy Russell is an artist and Design PhD candidate at Central Saint Martins (London Doctoral Design Centre studentship). Practice-based research investigates whether her own practice of (re)drawing can translate into a praxis that could assist others to facilitate critical-dialogue engagement with designed body-image(s) in fashion and beauty magazine advertisementsImplementing social innovation to create a toolkit that augments participants reframing of an issue through drawing.

 

 

 

Followed by a Long Table with all the artists and designers and invited guests, held in the Nests at CSM.

 

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For information on Spotlight 2015, please see: http://doctoralplatformcsm.myblog.arts.ac.uk/events/csm-doctoral-student-exhibition-and-symposium/

 

The Doctoral Platform at CSM offers PhD candidates the space in which to meet, share research, as well as co-ordinate, curate and participate in a variety of events.

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